Can We Talk About Bradley Walsh Being A Stormzy Stan?

SCROLL DOWN FOR FULL ARTICLE

With Stormzy quickly marching towards national treasure status, it was no surprise to see him sat on the sofa for The Jonathan Ross Show. The episode guests were actor Vince Vaughan, actor/presenter Bradley Walsh and of course Big Mike himself.

As with most chat shows the aim is to get the diverse guests to interact and hilarity ensure. Sort of like inviting The Queen, your old Jamaican grandma and Kanye West to a dinner party. It’s hard to imagine some sort of sparks wouldn’t fly. i.e Great TV.

So sitting 24-year-old Stormzy between a Hollywood actor and a near 60-year-old television presenter was sure to make for great TV. Basically it was supposed to be awkward and we’d laugh at it. It’s old hat. Anytime a rapper ends up on Jonathan’s show he does his bit where he ‘raps’ poorly and the audience laugh at how inept he is.

So when Bradley innocently compliments Stormzy’s music while discussing his own; Jonathan leaps at the chance to create some awkward tension. He asks Bradley what his favourite Stormzy track is and Bradley shows himself up by pausing way too long to answer. That’s it, the jig is up, Bradley is old, over the hill and far from ‘down with the kids’. The audience laugh, Stormzy and Jonathan laugh at the predictably and everyone prepares to move on.

Until Bradley names deep cut ‘Velvet’ and after a thoughtful pause begins to sing ‘Blinded By Your Grace’. Yes ok, he says ‘Blinded By Y0ur faith‘ but he gets the rest of the song and melody right, proving he really does listen to Stormzy’s music.

Ok, ‘Man listens to music‘ isn’t exactly the most showstopping headline ever; but it’s fair to say that Bradley Walsh is pretty far outside of Stormzy’s target demographic. So it says one of three things:

1. Bradley Walsh listens to Stormzy.
2. Stormzy makes good music.
3. Bradley Walsh likes the two songs mentioned and doesn’t really care for the more ‘grimier’ sounds on the album. Or all of the above. But either way one thing it certainly does say, is Stormzy is a household name.

With award-winning Skepta’s, global Giggs’ and chart topping Stormzy’s it’s easy to take these moments for granted; but this would’ve been seen as a pipe dream a few years ago. Stormzy has ascended into that echelon of The Fugees, Outkast and Black Eyed Peas. Black music that crosses over so much that your  old Jamaican grandma will be caught humming it after church. It shows that despite the best efforts of the press, the music is for everyone, can connect on various levels and have a lasting impact.

That small interaction shows just how accessible this music is, how far it has come and that it’s destined to go even further on years to come.